The Catalyst

Ron Gallo, Post Animal

Live in the Atrium

Ron Gallo

Post Animal

Wed, February 13, 2019

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The Catalyst

Santa Cruz, CA

$16 in advance / $18 at the door

This event is 16 and over

Ron Gallo
Ron Gallo
Hi, my name is Ron Gallo. My previous artist bio started like this:

I straddle the fence between two mindsets: 1. The world is completely fucked. 2. The universe is inside you.

I sat on that (mostly in vans) long enough to lean heavily towards #2.

I sat in vans a lot this past year because at one point in time I was frustrated with humanity (but really myself) and from that came an album called “HEAVY META”. Apparently the sentiment resonated more with people in 2016 then when I wrote those songs in my apartment in Philadelphia in 3-4 years before that (probably because the current political and social climate) so suddenly that darkness turned into doing a lot of stuff I always wanted to do but never thought I would or could - like travel around with my friends, Joe Bisirri (bass) and Dylan Sevey (drums), and play shows for people with bands we love in places all over the world: Naked Giants, White Reaper, The Black Angels, Twin Peaks, Thee Oh Sees, Hurray For the Riff Raff to name a few.

“Write what you know!” They say.

Okay. 2017: Being constantly on highways, in vans, on planes, on stages, in greenrooms, on guestlists, turning a person into a brand, turning a real life human moment into a song into content into an asset to be monetized, talking to people about myself and stuff I wrote 3 years ago, watching it all unfold in the public eye from a phone in a van on a highway heading to a stage.

Do all that. Get back home for days at a time. Seek solitude. Friends and family and acquaintances followed along on Instagram. They think it looked glamorous out there “living the dream.” They ask me all about it, but I know the truth - it’s boring and unrelatable to identify as a musician rather than just a human - so I don’t have much to say about it besides “it happened” and it wasn’t what I thought it would be and it was beautiful and I am grateful but mostly this whole world of pursuing music and the music business is hilarious and none of it really matters in the grand scheme of things.” So the way I process all that is through an EP called “Really Nice Guys” which came out 1/19/18 on New West Records. On it you can find auto-tune, tantrums about algorithms, songs featuring iPhone tabla about being on a guestlist, underwhelming solos, a song called "YouTubular" and the true star of the whole thing: my moms boyfriend, Jerry, who we secretly captured candidly talking about the EP and made it the lead vocal on "Pull Quote" the EP's closing track.

For more perspective on yourself - Google image: “Earth”

Boom, ya gone,
With love, see you soon,
Ron Gallo
Post Animal
Post Animal
Bearing witness to the baroque clusterf*ckery of the world is no longer voluntary. We are all forced to watch. Every possible catastrophe vibrates in our pockets, demanding to be witnessed. In his second album, Forced Witness, out September 8th on Secretly Canadian, Alex Cameron's solution to the difficulties we face is a danceable and dangerous earnestness, a sense of honesty that heals and relieves even as it cleaves us or makes us laugh in self-defense. He's offering us vivid portraits of misfits who look at the world without illusion.

Recorded in Berlin, Los Angeles, and Las Vegas and produced by Cameron along withFoxygen's Jonathan Rado, these tracks at first seem shamelessly entertaining, the driving rhythms and rousing melodies embellished at every turn by Roy Molloy's warm hornwork. But the love songs and anthems of personal resilience contain as much raw humanity as they do a savvy grasp of the impossible loneliness of the times, especially apparent in the song, "Stranger's Kiss" -- Cameron's affecting duet with Angel Olsen (who also sings backup on lead single, "Candy May"). The defiantly bloody knuckles in "Runnin' Outta Luck," co-written by and featuring Brandon Flowers, and the grime of wet dreams in "Country Figs"occupy the same space as the great sadness of the internet in the catchy and contemplative song "True Lies," in which Cameron sings about that buzzing hive of randomized sexuality where we can either submit to the stirrings in our own laps or let our fragile hopes catfish us. Penultimate track "Marlon Brando," is, as Cameron describes it, "a study of a man in the hopeless pursuit of a woman. He is a familiar character in the world, a self-assured jock, a dullard, a low grade human who uses a specific kind of language when he finds a situation outside of his control. The song's lyrics present a damning indictment of homophobia and misogyny and their genesis in toxic masculinity."

If there is darkness in these songs, it is not because taboos can titillate but because Cameron knows that confession has a redeeming power and that people are often at their most startlingly beautiful when their skies have fallen. These songs are alive with the rich detail of life lived and the radical distinctiveness of the stories they tell feel universal. In these chaotic times when we aren't able to look away, Cameron is offering us a pure account of the world as he's seen it.
Venue Information:
The Catalyst
1011 Pacific Avenue
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060
http://www.catalystclub.com/