The Catalyst

Good Riddance

Live in The Atrium: Numbskull Presents

Good Riddance

Swingin' Utters, Western Addiction, Coercion

Sat, May 12, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

The Catalyst

Santa Cruz, CA

$20.00

Off Sale

This event is 21 and over

Good Riddance
Good Riddance
Politically charged punk rock group from Santa Cruz, California. Originally formed in 1986 the band went into hiatus in 1991 until 1993 due to lack of drummer and bassist. The bands style can be described as edgy melodic punk rock. The band has released nearly all of their releases through Fat Wreck Chords. On May 27th of 2007 they played their last show ever to a sold out crowd in their hometown. Good Riddance has decided to perform as a band again in 2012.

Members:-

Russ Rankin - Vocals (1986 to 2007, 2012 to present)
Luke Pabich - Guitar (1990 to 2007, 2012 to present)
Chuck Platt - Bass (1994 to 2007, 2012 to present)
Sean Sellers - Drums (1995 to 1999, 2006 to 2007, 2012 to present)

Past members:-

Rob Land - Guitar (1986 to 1991)
Brian Gilliam - (1991)
John Burnett - Bass (1986 to 1991)
Ken Frank - Bass (1988 to 1990 Fill-in)
Devin Quinn - Bass (1991 to 1993)
Tom Kennedy - Bass (1993 to 1994)
Rich McDermott - Drums (1986 to 1989, 1993 to 1995)
Jade Dylan - Drums (1988 to 1990 Fill-In, 1991 Full-Time)
Andrew Jackson - Drums (1990 to 1991)
Tony Palermo - Drums (1995 US/Canadian tour)
Dave Raun - Drums (2000)
David Wagenschutz - Drums (2001 to 2005)
Swingin' Utters
Swingin' Utters
Man, these days everyone with a chipped tooth and a bad haircut says they're street punk. It's almost gotten to the point where it just seems like gimmickry, like being bi-polar or good looking. But once in a while, a dude who works in a warehouse gets together with a truck driver and makes shit kickin' punk rock songs so ball-smashingly radical that they end up getting the guys from Me First and the Gimme Gimmes and One Man Army to help 'em sing, and the end result is everybody's favorite San Francisco institution that isn't completely riddled with glory holes, the Swingin' Utters. I know what you're saying: what the fuck am I doing reading a Swingin' Utters bio in 2011? Sure, they're pretty much the trailblaizenist band that ever decided to put grandpa's banjo and spittoon next to the marshall full stacks and the booze, but what have they done lately? Well, I'll tell you, you impudent young whippersnapper. They've recorded Here, Under Protest, the single best album of their already award winning career (handsomest ballsack on a punk, 2001-02 [Darius]) and that's saying something. It's, as Ron Burgundy would attest, a pretty big deal.

It's a big deal because the Utters have been kicking ass since even before 1995's The Streets Of San Francisco, which was so good that it got them signed to Fat Wreck Chords (back when that was a hard thing to do [Heyo!]), got them the attention of pretty much everyone that listens to good, aggressive music, got them on the Warped Tour and even won them a Bay Area Music award or two. Now, I know what you're thinking, and sure, awards shows can be a self congratulatory blow-a-thon, but when a bunch of vagabonds like the Utters stroll in drunk wearing Dickies and tee shirts and stagger out with some awards, to the chagrin of all the dipshits, well, that's pretty cool, right? Of course. So what happened then?

Well, they put out a ton of great records, including A Juvenile Product of the Working Class, Five Lessons Learned, Dead Flowers, Bottles, Bluegrass, and Bones, an eponymous record, and a veritable shit-ton of EP's and live stuff, toured relentlessly with such little-known bands as Rancid, NOFX, The Damned and Dropkick Murphys, sold over two hundred thousand records, annexed the golden voiced Spike Slawson of Me First and the Gimme Gimmes fame on bass and vocals, convinced Jack from Dead to Me and One Man Army to start playing guitar and singin' too, and suddenly, on Here, Under Protest, the Utters have found themselves with this insanely stacked, Voltron-esque lineup, boasting a goddamned reckless cavalcade of vocal ability. That's right, man. The Utters are bringin' THREE FUCKING LEAD VOCALISTS to the table, and three vocalists that all could (and do) front amazing bands of their own. It's like if Velvet Revolver was good or if the Backstreet Boys had stayed an oi band. Look, we're getting off the subject. The point is, the Utters are back with their first full length in eight years, one that features Spike and Jack singing alongside Johnny and Darius for the first time in, uh…ever, and one that is going to kick the dicks of the Oi/Streetpunk scene like only a bunch of dudes with shitty jobs, axes to grind, beers to drink and a history of defining and putting out the best records of the genre can do.

Here, Under Protest is fourteen tracks of the Irish/Oi/streetpunk sound that you've come to expect from the Utters, and it's also their best record. Look, all bios say that the musicianship is great and what you've become accustomed to is now being brought in bold new ways and then some, but this time, we're talking about the Swingin' Utters, and you already know how awesome they are, so let's fuck the pretense, and close by saying that despite the smug, 'eye on the exits' title of Here, Under Protest, these dudes show no signs of slowing down after a staggering twenty-one years of doing it. So here's a toast to the best new record by the best classic band in recent memory. In the words of my grandpa "To our wives and girlfriends! May they never meet!" Hey, whaddaya want? These are the Utters and it's been eight years since their last record. Drink up! Don't be such a dildo.
Western Addiction
Western Addiction
Some bands are formed out of necessity. Some are formed out of proximity. Some are formed from both.

Do you remember when punk rock didn't rely on prefixes? Like, you didn't have to say 'streetpunk' or 'crust punk' or "political punk" or 'shit punk' or 'art punk' or 'pop punk'? Simpler, more straightforward times. Not easier times, just times where punk wasn't shoved into smaller and smaller holes. That's what Western Addiction strive for. Fun times. Thinking-while-rockin' times. Pre-MTV musical genocide times. Vital times. Black Flag and Circle Jerks.

Western Addiction ain't a bunch of dummies. Cognicide ('thinking something to death') shows that. It's no 'let's drink a lot of whiskey, meaningfully sway our bullet belts in the faces of fourteen year olds, and sing about smashing the state,' credit card punk. They know the score and they aren't interested in candy coating it. Nor are they blowhard assholes, 'collecting what they're due.' Seriously, the only accolade they hope to not so secretly reap is that this record sells more than thirty copies.
Here's the Cliffs Notes bio: All four members of Western Addiction work at Fat Wreck Chords. That's where they met.

Slightly longer version: All four members have been around punk music for quite awhile. All of them, except Jason, have been, or are currently in, other bands. Yet all four members work, in different capacities, with punk musicians and labels on a daily basis. They all go to shows. They all show their support. They're neck deep America's thriving punk scene.

That said, Western Addiction are realistic, grounded, and paying their way. They just know how to get things done because they already know the ropes. Such knowledge and access has allowed them to play with such punk stalwarts TSOL, The Adicts, The Adolescents, and the Swingin' Utters.

They also move quickly. After the initial time it took the band to gel, recording tracks came in a flurry. Cognicide, their first LP, is their third release. First came a 7', Remember to Dismember (Fat), then a Split 12' EP with New Mexican Disaster Squad (No Idea), followed by a song contributed to Protect: A Benefit for the National Association to Protect Children.

In 2005, they toured Japan to help support NOFX and vanned down the California coast with Propagandhi. In 2006 they hit the East Coast with New Mexican Disaster Squad before going on an unplanned 7 year hiatus.
But they're back and are more than stoked to play backyard parties, basements, art galleries, community spaces, you name it. For Western Addiction, it's simple. They have a laser-directed idea of what they want to do: make and play good punk music. Nothing more, nothing less.
Venue Information:
The Catalyst
1011 Pacific Avenue
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060
http://www.catalystclub.com/