The Catalyst

Larry and His Flask, Scott Biram

Live in The Atrium

Larry and His Flask

Scott Biram

Whiskey Shivers

Wed, March 12, 2014

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

The Catalyst

Santa Cruz, CA

$10 in advance / $13 at the door

Off Sale

This event is 16 and over

Larry and His Flask
Larry and His Flask
Musical anthropologists interested in the study of just how fast a band can evolve need look no further than the six upright, upstanding men in Oregon's Larry and His Flask. Formed by brothers Jamin and Jesse Marshall in 2003, the Flask (as the band's expanding army of fans calls them) spent its first half-decade stuck in a primordial, punk-rock goop, where a blood-sweat-and-beers live show took priority over things like notes and melodies. Don't misunderstand: The band was (somewhat) skilled and an absolute joy to watch, but the goal was always the party over perfection.

Over the past two years, however, Larry and His Flask has gone from crawl to sprint at breakneck speed. First, Jamin Marshall moved from gargling-nails vocals to drums. Guitarist Ian Cook became the band's primary voice. And a trio of talented pickers and singers — Dallin Bulkley (guitars), Kirk Skatvold (mandolin) and Andrew Carew (banjo) — joined the family. (And no, you didn't miss something. No one is named Larry.)

Determined to make music for a living or die trying, the six brothers set out in a van, intent on playing for anyone, anywhere at any time. From coffee shops to dive bars and street corners to theater stages, the Flask honed their sound and show through experience, attacking each gig like buskers who must grab and hold the attention of passersby in hopes of collecting enough change to get to the next town.

By 2009, Larry and His Flask's train began gaining steam. The band's new songs are a blurry blend of lightning fast string-band picking, gorgeous nods to old-school country, and sublime multi-part harmonies, all presented through a prism of punk chaos. The boys have grown and changed, yes, but their shows are still gloriously physical displays of live music's sheer power. In other words, keep your eyes peeled, or risk taking the heavy end of Jesse Marshall's flailing, stand-up bass right between the eyes.

A slot supporting the Dropkick Murphys in the Flask's hometown led to an invitation to open for the Celtic punk kingpins across the eastern half of the United States, as well as an opportunity to finally record their new, twangier sound. The result is Larry and His Flask's three-song, self-titled 7″ record, pressed in a limited run that's quickly being snapped up by the band's new fans, who've been clamoring for a sip of aural hooch to call their own.

In mid-2010, the Flask is holed up in their crash pad in Central Oregon, working on songs for their first full-length, playing gigs here and there, and, in the words of Jesse Marshall, "fixing the van and all our broken shit" in anticipation of the next leg of a lifelong tour. Keep up with the band's never-ending tour schedule at www.larryandhisflask.com
Scott Biram
Scott Biram
Scott H. Biram sings with the soul and conviction of a real hillbilly bluesman. Seasoned beyond his years, the 29 year old recreates the sounds and songs of the depression era (i.e. Leadbelly, Woody Guthrie, Son House, Mance Lipscomb, Big Joe Williams, Bill Monroe) while blending his own background of punk rock, rough edged country blues, and raunchy bluegrass. His music can be compared to other one-man band acts such as Bob Log III and Hasil Adkins. Scott's distinctive sound comes by way of a collection of beat-up amps and CB microphones accompanied by an overdriven footstomp board and a white trash yodel.

In January 2003 he was voted into Austin's Top 5 Best New Acts of 2002 by the Austin American Statesman. Biram's first release, This is Kingsbury? (2000), introduced him as a talented multi-instrumentalist who precariously balances traditional blues and raucous punk rock. Recently his original song "Truckdriver" from his second release Preachin' and Hollerin'(2002) was picked up by none other than Hank Williams III, and is scheduled to appear on Williams' next album. His third record, Lo-fi Mojo, was released in February 2003.

Biram frequently tours both the East and West coasts, the Midwest, New Mexico, Arizona, Oklahoma, Tennesee, Kentucky, and has become a local legend in Louisiana and Texas. He's scheduled to appear on television programs on FOX and ABC, as well as a nationally syndicated commercial for Jack Daniels Hard Cola in early 2003. Los Angeles based production company, Gallos Diablos (credits include The Sundance Film Festival), have begun filming a documentary about life on the road with Scott H. Biram. The working title is "Lost Case of Being Found" taken from the Biram original song, and is scheduled to be released in 2004.

Apparently Scott H. Biram will not die. On March 25th, 2003 he was involved in a horrific head-on collision with an eighteen wheeler, in which he suffered compound fractures in multiple limbs and severe internal damage. After a month in the hospital, 12 surgeries, and 4 months in a wheelchair, "Bounce Back" Biram has picked up where he left off--Preachin' and Hollerin'. In his first show back he played from a wheelchair, I.V. still dangling from his arm!

Biram holds his own while playing on bills including Hank Williams III, Fat Possum recording artists Cedell Davis and T-model Ford, The Gourds, Del McCoury, Peter Rowan, Wayne "The Train" Hancock, Toni Price, The Derailers, Dale Watson, Ian Moore, Daniel Johnston and The Bad Livers. Catch this rural Texas resident's unique shotgun approach to keeping dying old-time musical genres alive.
Whiskey Shivers
Whiskey Shivers
Fresh off the heels of their 2013 Austin Music Award win for Best Bluegrass Band and a twenty show marathon during SXSW, Whiskey Shivers hasn't had much time to breathe. In the last 365 days Whiskey Shivers has had a music video go viral, made national television appearances on NBC's revolution and Travel Channel's No Reservations, played a string of sold-out shows up and down the east and west coasts, and tracked a brand new record with producer Robert Ellis. The Austin, Texas based trash-grass outfit show no signs of slowing down this year.
Venue Information:
The Catalyst
1011 Pacific Avenue
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060
http://www.catalystclub.com/