The Catalyst

The Expendables

The Expendables

The Expanders, Law

Sat, December 17, 2016

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Catalyst

Santa Cruz, CA

$22.00

Off Sale

This event is 16 and over

The Expendables
The Expendables
For eighteen years The Expendables have been bringing their perspective to the world of reggae rock. Instead of following the traditional cookie-cutter blend of reggae, punk, ska and hip-hop commonly replicated in the genre, The Expendables have perfected their own unique approach of face-melting solos, mind-bending jams and danceable grooves, blurring the lines of where one genre ends and another begins.
Hailing from shores of Santa Cruz, California, three quarters of this four piece met in the halls of Soquel High. After high school Adam Patterson (Drums/Vocals), Raul Bianchi (Lead Guitar/Keys) and Geoff Weers (Guitar/Vocals) would part ways from their high school bass player and in 1999 the band would enlist hometown native Ryan DeMars (Bass), bringing new influence to the band’s stage presence and their songwriting process.
Once the new line up was solidified, the band worked tirelessly playing shows regionally as well as recording and self-releasing three albums, No Time To Worry (2000), Open Container (2001) and Gettin’ Filthy (2004). This determined work ethic would capture the attention of Slightly Stoopid front men and Stoopid Records label owners Miles Doughty and Kyle McDonald. Doughty and McDonald would take a strong interest in the band, first taking them on tour supporting Slightly Stoopid’s shows, then signing The Expendables to Stoopid Records, releasing the label’s first non Slightly Stoopid release, 2007s self-titled The Expendables. In 2010 the partnership would also produce Prove It, staking the bands claim as one of the genre’s heavy hitters.
Three years after Prove It the band would start tracking at JingleTown Recording, a bay area studio owned by the members Green Day. The beautiful studio would be used for two recording sessions, one in 2013 and one in 2014 setting the stage for the bands new release.
On January 13, 2015 The Expendables dropped Sand In the Sky to a hungry fan base excited for the bands new album. Fans immediately responded, loving the new tracks and gravitating toward the hypnotic Starry Night, dance-friendly jam Music Move Me as well as Nothing I Wouldn’t Do bringing a slight blend of the bands older sound back into the mix.
The band has taken no down time jumping straight out on 2015’s Winter Blackout Tour currently traveling across the country jamming to large crowds everywhere. With a date slated on this Summer’s Wakarusa festival and plenty of touring plans in the work this is going to be another great year for The Expendables.
The Expanders
The Expanders
The five-piece band comprised of John Asher (Drums, Vocals), John Butcher (Guitar, Vocals), Roy Fishell (Organs), Chiquis Lozoya (Bass, Vocals), and Devin Morrison (Guitar, Vocals) have been making reggae fans and critics take note with their refreshing sound that references the “golden era” of reggae. Morrison and Butcher grew up listening to the record collection of famed reggae archivist Roger Steffens, and credit much of their love and knowledge to the accessibility and education of those experiences. Becoming friends with Steffens’ son, they developed an obsession with exploring the deepest reaches of the genre.

The Expanders’ new album Hustling Culture was released June 16, 2015, on indie tastemaker label Easy Star Records. Hustling Culture is the band’s third studio album, but for the band members feels like their first proper album as a cohesive unit. Asher explains, “Our first album was a collection of music from good friends making a record together. Our second album was a great covers album, but Hustling Culture is the band coming into its own with our songwriting and musicianship.” Morrison adds, “For this album we spent more time prepping and rehearsing, giving us more confidence in the recording studio. The result made the process more fun and enjoyable as we approached the song-writing in a more organized way and explored a wider range of topics than on the first album. Our combined efforts really shine through and all the musicians really stepped up and gave an inspired effort on the whole record.” In addition to the core members, their extended family includes keyboardist Roger Rivas of The Aggrolites and Rivas Recordings. Rivas has been an integral part of The Expanders’ recordings and helped maintain and produce the authentic sounds, which shine through on all the band’s releases.

Hustling Culture was recorded entirely on analogue tape at Killion Sound in North Hollywood, CA, from 2012-2014. The studio is a favorite recording place for the band because it’s run by Sergio Rios (Orgone), a friend who understands their unique aesthetic and has the gear to capture it, giving the album a warm and colorful palette.

The album title, Hustling Culture, comes from the album’s opening line: “One dollar gone but the next soon come, we never stop from hustling culture.” Morrison explains, “Everyone has a hustle, and ours is roots & culture music. It’s a way of reminding ourselves that outside of just entertaining and financial gain, there is a bigger picture and larger purpose for writing about the topics and playing the style of roots reggae that we do.” The Expanders’ music is a reminder that reggae music wasn’t born in a tropical beach paradise, but in the impoverished and underprivileged areas of Jamaica, resulting in a passionate expression for human rights, social justice and freedom from oppression.

There is a subtle, yet powerful conscious thread woven throughout Hustling Culture. “Uptown Set,” for example, is about the hidden effects of our country’s party lifestyle, which brings suffering and misery to innocent poor people caught along the routes where party drugs come across the border. “Thanks For Life” is a dedication to women, the struggle they face every day, and the debt of life that we all owe to them. “Top Shelf” is a tribute to the ganja farmers and the reflection of the changing cultural views on marijuana.

The band is part of a burgeoning Los Angeles reggae scene that sprang in large part from The Blue Beat Lounge (the longest running weekly ska night that happened at the Knitting Factory) and LA’s longtime premier weekly reggae night Dub Club held at the Echoplex. A song that was inspired by a key member of that scene is “Reggae Pops,” an infectious instrumental tune laid over a “steppers riddim” featuring John Butcher on lead guitar and Dan Hastie from Orgone on clavinet. The title was chosen as a tribute to the late-great Reggae Pops (born Nemencio Jose Andujar) who was a pillar of the Southern California reggae community for decades. Morrison states, “It’s impossible to accurately describe what he meant to reggae music in Los Angeles, but those who remember him from shows will never forget him. He was a dancer, a fan, and a presence that was always felt. He was the man!”

The Expanders are on tour now supporting the release. Morrison concludes, “Our goal is to bring that vintage reggae feel and sound that we love to places where people might not get to hear it on a regular basis.”
Law
Law
First Philadelphia area performance for this new Brooklyn duo. LAW fuse equal parts early Mute projects such as DAF and The Normal with the industrial crush of Broken Flag pioneers Ramleh and Controlled Bleeding, while maintaining a punk sensibility all their own. Releases coming soon on Blind Prophet Records/Robert & Leopold.
Venue Information:
The Catalyst
1011 Pacific Avenue
Santa Cruz, CA, 95060
http://www.catalystclub.com/